Mark DuBois - World Renowned Lyric Tenor
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Opera York's Gala at Maxim's

By Sybille Forster-Rentmeister
Echo Germanica

What a difference a year makes when the right people get together and make a concerted effort to advance a common cause. This year’s gala fundraiser of Opera York was bigger, better and even more entertaining than the last one. This time the Famee Furlane transformed into Maxim’s, the French nightclub where the future of the so-called Merry Widow is decided.


Mark DuBois single-handedly rewrote Franz Lehar’s famous operetta to make it suitable for the hall. He adapted it so brilliantly that cuts in the storyline were not noticed at all. The fabulous singers moved from song to aria with ease, accompanied by a small orchestra, part of the set and just big enough to create the right illusions.

A narrator, Anthony Paton, filled in any open questions to connect the pearls of music with each other.


The audience, just having enjoyed a sumptuous Italian dinner with wine and all the trimmings, felt as though they were part of the set at Maxim's, guests in this French house of hospitality, where Europe’s famous and infamous upper crust and pretenders hang out when they want to see and be seen. And there was indeed a lot to see, even in the audience that night in mid-April.

The Mayor of Vaughan, Michael Di Biase, turned up and so did other politicians, including the Hon. Elinor Caplan, P.C., M.P. It is really good to know that the opera has so much support among the powers that are. Perhaps the dream of a performance centre for the Vaughan region will come true soon.

Co-Founder and President Philip Trow, himself a musician, and Joan Sax, also Co-Founder of Opera York and a musician, both had welcomed everyone heartily and praised their Volunteers and Artists, especially Mark DuBois, who had taken on the many hats of Artistic Director, Tenor, Conductor and everything else that such a production brings with it, his wife Maria by his side as Stage Manager. The brilliant adaptation was itself a dramaturgical masterpiece, proving once again that Mark DuBois is not called a Canadian treasure without cause.

Corinne Lynch navigated her way effortlessly through the plot thick with men wanting to end up with her, or rather her millions. Her lovely voice caught just the right timbre when she remembers her youth, her homeland with everyone’s favourite aria Villia and other songs.

Gisèle Fredette surprised again with her effervescent performance of Valencienne, the "anständige Frau", the proper wife, who would never flirt with another man, never!

Her husband is Baron Zeta, played by Roy Schatz, who brings his immense comic character quality to the part of ridiculously naïve husband.


The lover of course is sung by Mark DuBois, who else could (almost) convince a lady to run away with him, conduct an orchestra and see to it that every performer feels great on stage, including young and newer talent like Lauren Segal, soprano, as Olga, and Rosalind Mills, mezzo soprano, as Sylviane. Mark Potvin as St. Brioch fills in the story with his comedic talent and fine baritone voice, as does Bernie Lynch, tenor, as M. Cascada.


And who gets the Merry Widow after all is said and done? Count Danilo of course, Anna Glawari’s first love, sung by Matthew Zadow in a youthful and rich baritone voice. Tall dark and handsome he played a very convincing playboy, plagued by doubts and lack of commitment, yet pursued by woman everywhere.


Anne Martin, a Director with Opera York, pursued him relentlessly and with much verve in her cameo roll as Praskowia. And through the last act the audience was treated to real life dancing by the St. Elizabeth Dancers, showing that they can do the CANCAN, as did Gisèle Fredette in a very "spritzy" number with show costume.




The production, neither concert nor full version, was a unique blend of ingenuiety and know-how, a feast for the eyes and the ears, utilizing this venue to its best advantage. The one thing that could stand improvement is the sound system, which one cannot do without in a venue like this. It was not built with perfect acoustics in mind. Even the best performers will have a hard time projecting to the end of the hall in a restaurant with a house system. And if we consider that there was practically no time for a full technical dress rehearsal, then we know that we witnessed a miracle, which was well rewarded with long salvos of applause.


The silent auction had many more items to offer than last time and should have raised a nice sum. Even Ms. Caplan bid and won her bid. The 450 plus people attending definitely had a wonderful evening and walked away as happy as the opera company and its cast and volunteers. Everyone we spoke to said that they could hardly wait for the next offering.

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